Knook Expanded Beginner Kit


Knook Expanded Beginner Kit

  • Made in United States

The Knook Expanded Beginner Set lets you use light, medium, and bulky weight yarns to make small, medium, and large projects–including full-size afghans! Replacing traditional knitting needles, these unique crochet hooks have a hole in one end for a cord to hold your stitches as you create true knitted fabric. Each set contains 5 bamboo Knooks in sizes E-3.5 mm, G-4.0 mm, H-5.0 mm, I-5.5 mm, and J-6.0 mm; 5 cords in two 36 lengths, two 72, and one 120; 3 cord clips; 3 yarn needles; and a comple

List Price: $ 19.95

Price: $ 10.59

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3 Comments/Reviews

  • Rian Shadowhorse says:
    205 of 206 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Brilliant concept! Not-so-thrilling execution, November 8, 2011
    By 

    I’ll say this again and again: the Knook is a brilliant concept! I’ve been knitting and crocheting for around twenty-six years, and for a long time I’ve thought of Tunisian crochet as sort of bridging the gap between the needles and the hook. And now, the Knook actually *does* bridge the gap; I can easily flow from a knit fabric to crochet and back again without ever having to change the basic tool with which I’m working; I can even throw in some Tunisian entrelac crochet for good measure if I feel like it. Crochet edging around a knit project? A snap! The Knook concept is so simple that it’s brilliant. If you’re already familiar with Tunisian crochet, then you will most likely be able to pick up the Knook rather quickly.

    A few weeks ago I bought The Knook Kit at Walmart, and it was cheaper than on Amazon (nothing against Amazon; I just happened to walk past the display in the store and picked it up on impulse). Inside the blister pack, you get three Knooks, in sizes G (6/4mm), H (8/5mm), and I (9/5.5mm), three different colours of cord (which serve as your “lifeline,” and hold your working fabric), and a 32-page instruction booklet. The booklet contains patterns for a simple infinity scarf (to practise the garter stitch), a spa cloth (which allows you to practise purling on the Knook), a baby blanket (which is composed of a dozen squares that allow you to switch back and forth from knitting to purling), and a diamond lap throw (which is worked in three long strips). All patterns are designed for beginners and are worked with worsted weight yarns. There are more Knook patterns on-line; there is even a sampler scarf pattern that is worked in both knit and crochet — it’s actually pretty cool.

    TIP: before you get started with the Knook, I recommend watching the free video tutorials online; there are quite a few of them, and you can see how the Knook can be used to make cables, work in the round, etc. Do a search for them or check the manufacturer’s Web site; you’ll find them.

    ANOTHER TIP: the Knooks are made of bamboo; one or all of them may feel a little rough. If this is the case for you, then simply put a drop or two of oil (grapeseed, olive, coconut, or another vegetable oil) on your hands, and give the Knooks a little polish. Leave the Knooks alone overnight to allow the oil to be absorbed into the fibres. This smoothed out the rough spots on my Knooks; it may do the same for yours.

    For an experienced knitter/crocheter, I wouldn’t say that there’s too great of a learning curve for the Knook; rather, it’s more of an “adjustment curve.” It took me a little bit of time to adjust to knitting with a hook and a cord, especially because I can knit faster with two needles — and I’m not even an exceptionally fast knitter. The main frustration that I occasionally have with the Knook is that the loops of my working fabric sometimes get smaller and tighten around the lifeline cord. This happens because I might hold the working fabric a bit too tightly, or I accidentally pull on the fabric when turning, or what-have-you. The resulting effect is that it slows me down because I have to manually tug on the next loop slightly to allow the Knook to pass through it. Multiply this minor inconvenience by the number of loops I have to manually expand, and the time does add up. For the sake of a brilliantly concepted product, I’m going to chalk this up to my adjustment curve. As far as doing cables: maybe it’s just me, but I’d rather have two knitting needles and a cable needle. While one *can* do cables on the Knook, it’s just faster the traditional way.

    Really strong positives for the Knook: it’s great for crocheters who don’t know how to knit with two needles and want to create knitted fabrics; for projects on the road, the Knook is totally portable (no fears of losing the second knitting needle or a broken cable on circulars!); and it’s good for simple stitches like stockinette or garter. An added bonus is that once you learn how to use the Knook, you’re just one step away from learning to do Tunisian crochet.

    Things that made the execution less-than-thrilling for me: it takes longer to knit with the Knook than with two needles; while you’re learning (or in the adjustment curve phase), your knitted fabrics may turn out a bit lacier than you’d expect, or uneven in tension (as other reviewers have commented); and the lifeline cord is a bit awkward to work with. On one occasion, I was working on a piece that was kind of wide, and I accidentally pulled out the wrong end of the lifeline. Sadness. It wasn’t *too* grim, though, because picking up the stitches is fairly easy … it’s also frustrating.

    Would I still keep working with the Knook? Yes. Would I recommend the Knook to someone else, or buy it as a gift for someone? Yes. Its potential as a tool is exciting; I’d like to see this product do well and see more kits with larger sizes of Knooks,…

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  • Shela Simpson says:
    74 of 74 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Knit Quick!, March 8, 2012
    By 
    Shela Simpson (CRAWFORDSVILLE, IN, US) –

    Yes, I read the other reviews and I must admit I thought them surprising. If you do not know how to knit, or if you have issues with using the two knitting needles, then the Knook might work very well for you. I have crocheted for years, and knitted only when forced to because I found the needles ackward. Probably just something I struggled with, having leaned to crochet first, that is where my comfort level was. When I saw the Knook I thought ‘what the heck’ it is based upon a crochet hook maybe I will like it better. I picked it up at Hobby Lobby for $9.00 (sorry Amazon) and brought it home. In just a few minutes I was creating both a knit and pearl stitch. Having crocheted for years, the learning curve was about 20 seconds. Some say it is not as fast as knitting, and that might well be true for accomplished knitters, but if you have never knitted, or struggled to knit this is an easy solution to get you going. I like it because it is very easy to pick up and put down if interrupted, easy to pick up any missed or dropped stitches as you go, and yes, you can create many other knitted combination stitches. About the only thing I have not been able to get it to do is circular work…but I am working on that! I easily knitted a scarf in one evening while watching television, as the technique seemed natural to me after crocheting for so long. So, if you want to knit but put it off, give this a try. The other nice thing about this was that the instructions were done for left hand and right hand – separately – so you did not have to try to decode right hand instructions to get yourself going – something we left handers appreciate.

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  • Debbie W. says:
    31 of 32 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Great for non-knitters, September 13, 2012
    By 
    Debbie W. (Atlanta, Ga) –

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Knook Expanded Beginner Kit (Paperback)
    I have been using my Knook for a couple of weeks and I am really impressed with the results I am seeing. I do crochet and have tried knitting with needles several times but just can’t seem to get both my hands to work together. I like the smoothness of the knit stitch so I decided to order the Knook.
    It works a little differently than regular crochet, so read the directions thoroughly. You Tube is a fantastic resource. Also check out the manufacturer’s website for more instructions, videos, and patterns.
    One tip: I found it helpful to apply Fray Check, a clear seam sealant, to the ends of the silky cords that are used with the hook. This makes the ends stiffer so they go through the small holes in the hooks more easily. I applied it with my fingers, starting about one inch from the ends and running my fingers down and off the ends of the cords. It dries in a few minutes.
    And be patient! It always takes me a while to learn any new skill with my hands (you have heard of people who are ambidexterous? Well, I am no-bidexterous), but I was doing pretty well after a few hours. If you are coordinated enough to already be a knitter, you will probably find that the Knook is slower than your needles. But for those like me that like the look but can’t control the needles and yarn at the same time, The Knook appears to be an answer. It is going slower than my usual crochet, but I am improving and gaining confidence. I am working on my first Knooked scarf and have it by my chair so I can work on it while watching TV. Every time I pick it up I find I am a little faster than before. I am glad I ordered the Knook.

    Update 10/6/2012 I am now Knooking much faster than I can knit! I have completed a couple of scarves for Christmas presents (and one for me!). I have also found a perfect use for the Knook: Check out the new “yarns” that make the ruffly, frilly scarves. I tried knitting one but I had the same old problems. Then I found a crochet pattern, but that was a disaster! This “yarn” is made into a netting type fabric a couple of inches wide, and after I crocheted the first row, I couldn’t find the stitches. With the Knook, the stitches are held in place with the working cord, which seperates them from the rest of the yarn and makes it very simple to make these georgious scarves. Because each scarf is 10 stitches or less across,( I made one with 4 stitches across that made it really long) it doesn’t take too long to finish one, but each stitch takes longer to do than working with a single stranded yarn.
    I like my Knook more and more with each completed project.

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